Prognostication of the Japanese War

Lt. (j.g.) Gilbert Steingart
U.S.S. Ocelot, FPO San Francisco
Thursday 24 May 1945, 7:15 PM
At Sea
Dearest Eleanor,
          Hello Sweetheart, I really hit the jackpot his morning.  I got eight letters from you and one each your mother and Uncle Mike.  However, I was busy with patients all morning so it was 11:30 before I got a chance to read my mail.
          After lunch I read a little from the book "Pastoral" and took care of another patient.  Then I went up on deck and enjoyed a nice refreshing breeze.  Gee what a difference it makes. My room, which always was the coolest one in the ship, is even cooler now.  Bet that tonight, I have to use a sheet and maybe the spread too.
          At 5:15 I showered and changed for dinner and after chow went up on the fo'castle and watched another beautiful sunset.  A full moon was out and you could follow its silvery path on the sea clear out to the horizon.  Pretty and comfortable as it was I left for our little daily visit. The four officers who were with me wondered what I could possible write every night.  However I do try to say something interesting.
          Now your mail.  The letters were written Saturday. Sunday and Monday 12, 13, and 14.  I'm tickled to hear that Norma got along so well with her illness.  You do seem to be kept fairly occupied and that is well.  The place "Tropics" brings back many happy memories to me too.  When I get the novelties that I'm making for you and the kids finished,  I'm going to make one for Ethyl.    The Leavys have really been nice to you.  As for your darling (?) sister Ruth I shall make no comments.
          You recall my prognostication of the Japanese war and now you are reading that others, who should know, say more or less the same thing.  Let's keep our fingers crossed and pray.
          Jack Taylor's experience as a German prisoner is horrible.  However I wasn't too surprised because I had read in an April issue (I don't remember which one) of Time a recount of the different German prison camps.  I understand movies were taken and are horrible and gruesome. I wouldn't recommend that you see them.
          Who does Linda take after?  You're no artist and neither am I.  I'm just as proud of her as she is herself.  I've been neglectful of my letters to the kids. I'll write one tomorrow and try to write regularly after that.
          Don't know why you had to give our mothers gifts after I told you I had sent something.  Something small from the kids would have been sufficient.  One place you can cut down on--gifts.
          Just keep on planning Sweet.  Every plan we ever made was carried out and those you make now will be sure to materialize after this war is over.
          I know Mothers Day was not a happy day for you but on the other hand we shouldn't complain.  After all the whole family is well and the men who are away from home are all safe.  And by the way, don't you worry about me.  I've got a soft touch here. As far as fighting the war goes, I'm pretty safe all the time.
          Now Honey, don't you chastise me for not writing a real love letter.  You should know your old man by now.  I'm just saving up all my love for you for the time when I come home.  If you recall I never even had a line when I was single. I always did think that action spoke louder than words.  Of course I miss you Sweet but I feel better not pouring "salt on wounds."  In another few days it'll be ten months (it really is seems like ten years) since the day we said good-bye.  So--be a good teach and when I get back you can keep me after school and give me some extra coaching.
          So now I can't even dance with any of the women on Harry's side of the family.  OK but I won't take the divorce threat seriously.
          Yes I get the B'nai B'rith Bulletin.  As a matter of fact I got that and a Southern California State Dental Bulletin yesterday.
          Of course you can have a new fur coat.  However as I've said before, I'd rather you waited until I got back before you got one.  OK?
          Darling, I've been scribbling now for forty-five minutes and my writing is progressively getting more illegible so I'd better sign off.
          Goodnight my Sweet until tomorrow
Yours alone,
Gil